3 Fun Ways to Work Your Brain and Improve Memory - Cerebrum Health Centers
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3 Fun Ways to Work Your Brain and Improve Memory

3 Fun Ways to Work Your Brain and Improve Memory

At Cerebrum Health Centers we treat patients with a variety of neurological issues – from traumatic brain injuries and concussions to dementia. When the brain is injured or experiences deterioration due to aging or disease, memory issues are commonplace. Fortunately, most people can improve memory function through brain therapy, medical treatment and on their own.

In fact, kicking your memory into gear is easier and more fun in today’s world due to the emergence of games and activities available online and in the community. Research shows that even as our brain cells wither away and die, the brain can actually develop new and stronger connections. You just need to challenge your brain and put it to work.1

The best part is that brain and memory-enhancing options are plentiful. From traditional board games and puzzles to digital apps and dance moves, you’re sure to find a brain workout that holds your interest. Here are several ideas to get you started!

1) Try Traditional Games and Puzzles

Any game that requires you to reach into your memory to proceed can help stretch your brain and boost memory. Crossword puzzles (word lovers) and Sudoku puzzles (numbers fans) are two great options – and they are readily available in print and online.

Card games like Concentration, where you need to match numbers or pictures, can also be a great place to start. Board games such as Scattergories, Pictionary or Codenames: Pictures, which require you to remember past moves or plays in order to win, are great options as well.

2) Use Online Tools and Apps

There is no shortage of resources for memory tools, games and apps in the digital world. Websites such as www.mindgames.com offers free games and puzzles that appeal to a variety of tastes, including games for memory, brain, words or Sudoku, plus puzzles and more.

Both Apple and Android platforms offer hundreds of great apps and games that you can download on your smartphone or tablet. Some great examples include:

•  Fit Brains Trainer (iTunes) focuses on improving short-term memory by recalling information. Games are timed, and you can advance to the next level once you reach preset benchmarks.

•  Guess the Song (Google Play) is great for music lovers, and you can play it alone or with friends. Choose your favorite category – some include Pop, Rap, One Hit Wonders, Hard Rock, 60s, 70s, 80s and more – and try to guess the name of the song.

•  Music Game (iTunes) is like playing Go Fish, except with tunes. Colored buttons light up one by one and you recreate the song/pattern by clicking on the colored buttons.

•  Math Workout (Google Play) allows you to workout your brain while doing math problems (add/subtract, multiply/divide, times tables, etc.). Take your play to the next level by challenging other players.

3) Move Your Body

When you exercise your body, your brain gets exercise, too. Movement requires thought, while complex moves – say a complicated dance routine – require concentration and memorization.

If you need to exercise (and we all do), try taking a workout class at your local gym that requires a sequence of repeated moves that you need to memorize. Zumba – a Latin-inspired workout routine – is one way to combine repetitive dance moves with great music. If you prefer to exercise your brain and body at home, look for DVDs, digital workout programs online or one of the many fitness apps available for your smartphone or tablet.

If you’d like to learn about the memory, concussion and brain injury treatment and therapy options available to you at Cerebrum Health Centers, contact us. We’d be happy to schedule a confidential consultation with you at your convenience. Give us a call at (855) 444-2724 to learn more.

 

 

* Websites and app recommendations provided for information only. No endorsement is implied.

Photo Source: © termis1983 – Fotolia.com

Resource:

1. Peiffer AM, Mozolic JL, Hugenschmidt CE, Laurienti PJ. Age-related multisensory enhancement in a simple audiovisual detection task. Neuroreport. 2007 Jul 2;18(10):1077-81.]]>